Engineering a Better Surfboard - Lamina
Stu Bowen sat on a beach in Western Australia, taking in the sights and sounds of surfers enjoying the day. A long-time surfer himself, Bowen’s love for the sport was rivalled only by another great passion: environmentalism.
15701
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-15701,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-theme-ver-13.0,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.5,vc_responsive

Engineering a Better Surfboard

Stu Bowen sat on a beach in Western Australia, taking in the sights and sounds of surfers enjoying the day. A long-time surfer himself, Bowen’s love for the sport was rivalled only by another great passion: environmentalism. On that particular day, Bowen’s two passions would collide in a most fortuitous way.

“It frustrated me to the point of action,” Bowen recalled. “I had to sit down and say ‘there’s got to be a better way.’”

Bowen was frustrated by the excessive number of surfboards he saw snapping in half. If you’re not a surfer, you might be surprised to learn just how short-lived surfboards are. The life expectancy of a high-performance short board—the average board for most people—is only six to 12 months. If you’re a pro surfer pushing your board to the limit, you’ll be lucky to get 20 surfs out of it.